The Dark Side of the New Age “Love and Light”

To my knowledge, the guys over at The Spirit Science never addressed the death of rapper Courtney Jamal Dewar (aka Capital Steez) who was a big fan of their videos. This is most likely because this young man took his own life when he leapt off a building in New York City in the late hours of December 23rd, 2012. Capital Steez was often vocal about his “new age” belief system and his music, art reflected his troubled view of reality.

The song “Like Water,” sounds good until Steez drops a reference to the pineal gland or “third eye” in only the third line, Common Intro: They say signs of the end is near. 1st Verse: And I quote, we came like them niggas in boats. Still think it’s a joke? Your third eye vision is broke” (Pro Era 2012).

The common intro, “They say signs of the end is near,” is a lyric that the reader of this blog post should keep in mind going forward. Because, not only did Capital Steez believe in the new age nonsense surrounding the “December 21st, 2012” doomsday phenomenon, but he was living proof of the negative impact that the paranoid hell of conspiracy theories can have on your life, relationships and work opportunities.

Continue reading “The Dark Side of the New Age “Love and Light””

Advertisements

An Introduction to “Gang-Stalking”

An Introduction to the Delusion of “Gang-Stalking”

If you’ve spent any time on YouTube, then you’re probably familiar with “compilation videos.” These videos range in subject matter from normal things like popular songs, movies and sports clips to compilations of extreme events such as natural disasters, fights and public “freakouts.”

The motivation for this blog post came after viewing one of the latter types of compilations. It was made up of short cell phone video clips taken of people “freaking out” in public and several of these people appeared to be suffering from some kind of mental disorder.

A topic was highlighted in one of these compilation videos that I’d never come across before. At the end of the video, “Public Freakout Compilation #104,” a woman is recording some drugged-out young adults who are stuck on the side of the road with a flat tire; the woman claims that they are “gang-stalking” her.

It’s obvious that the woman recording the video is unwell and has misinterpreted this group of burn-outs, and their shoddy Kia Sportage, as willing actors in a malevolent plot against her.

Any denial on their part only strengthens her conviction that they are gang-stalking her. The end of the video is anti-climatic as nothing is actually happening and a lot of it is taking place inside of this woman’s head:

What is the delusion of “gang-stalking”?

Continue reading “An Introduction to “Gang-Stalking””